Agriculture

Agriculture 111.3 (W97)

Agricultural Science I

 CRN: 

Term: 1 (Online)

 Time: Online 

Description:

An introduction to agricultural systems with a focus on sustainability in a changing environment. Current agricultural challenges and issues will be used to highlight and illustrate the interactions between plant, animal, microbial, human and environment components. The soil/plant/environment interface is emphasized. Management decisions affecting agricultural systems, cropping and land use are examined both regionally and globally. Students will also exercise the research process using scientific literature to investigate a hypothesis.

Syllabus:

Agriculture 112.3 (W96)

Agriculture Science II

 CRN: 24640 

Term: 2 (Online)

 Time: Online 

Description:

An introduction to agricultural systems and the interactions between microbial plant, animal, and human components. The emphasis is on issues and problems associated with animal production, value-added processing, marketing and the consumption of food.

Syllabus:

 

Agriculture 113.3 (W96)

Agri Food Issues and Institutions

 CRN: 26633 

Term: 2 (Online)

 Time: Online 

Description:

Examines the institutional setting within which the agri-food sector operates, as well as the drivers that affect this setting. Attention is paid to changes in the demand for food and bio-based products, the changing nature of production, and long-term trends in productivity, prices, employment and trade. The course examines the manner in which decisions about technology adoption, employment, diversification, R&D expenditures, and government policy are made; the institutions (e.g., laws, contracts, social norms, markets) that govern this decision making; the social, legal, political and economic factors that affect these institutions; as well as the implications for the agri-food sector of decisions made.

Prerequisite(s): ECON 111.

Syllabus:

Art

Art 111.6 (97)

Painting Foundation

 Term 1 CRN: 80895

 Term 2 CRN: 20778

Term: 1 & 2 (2 Tutorial and 2 Practicum hours)

Time: Every Second Saturday, 10:00 am  - 3:50 pm 

Professor: Clint Hunker

Description:

Explores the principles and elements of the language of art as related to the process of painting. Discussion and exposure to a variety of tools, materials, and media will be included. Historical reference to stylistic changes and various aesthetic concepts will be explored.

Syllabus: Click Here

 

Art 112.6 (97)

Drawing 1 Foundation

 Term 1 CRN: 81143

 Term 2 CRN: 21094

Term: 1 & 2 (3 Tutorial hours)

 Time: Wednesdays, 4:00 pm - 6:50 pm 

Professor: Grant McConnell

Description:

Learning to draw through the fundamentals offered in university instruction is one of the most satisfying experiences you will have in your education. We cover the basics of form in drawing, including the Elements of Art and the Principles of Design. In our studio environment at SPC we can offer a wide range of subject matter, from still life and figure drawing through to extended media investigations in drawing. Enhanced with in-class lectures and image presentations of the works of well-known artists, most of our class time involves active drawing. A supportive studio class environment is strongly emphasized. 

Note:

Drawing students must provide their own drawing materials.

Syllabus: Click Here

Art 222.3 (97)

Painting and Related Work II A

 CRN: 88635

Term: 1 (2 Tutorial and 2 Practicum hours)

 Time: Every Second Saturday  10:00am-3:50pm 

Professor: Clint Hunker

Description:

Continued identification of concepts and methods as they relate to the expression, structure, media and skills of pictorial art. Students may experiment with painting media and work from any subject matter. Students must acquaint themselves with the materials of their craft and its correct use in producing technically sound works of art. Emphasizes the student's artistic growth and development.

Prerequisite: ART 111.6 
Note: Painting students must provide their own painting materials. Students with credit for ART 271 or 272 or 211 may not take this course for credit.

Syllabus: Click Here 

 

Art 220.3 (97)

Drawing and Related Work II A

 CRN: 88634

Term: 1 (3 Tutorial hours)

 Time: Wednesdays, 4:00pm - 6:50pm  

Professor: Grant McConnell

Description:

Continued identification of concepts and methods as they relate to visual perception and expression through drawing, compositional design, graphic media and skills. Use of diverse media coupled with invented and observed form is encouraged.

Prerequisite: ART 112.6
Note: Drawing students must provide their own drawing materials. Students with credit for ART 212, ART 281 or 282 may not take this course for credit.

Syllabus: Click Here

Art 223.3 (96)

Painting and Related Work II B

 CRN: 29278

Term: 2 (2 Tutorial and 2 Practicum hours)

 Time: Every Second Saturday  10:00am-3:50pm 

Professor: Clint Hunker

Description:

Continued identification of concepts and methods as they relate to the expression, structure, media and skills of pictorial art. Students may experiment with painting media and work from any subject matter. Students must acquaint themselves with the materials of their craft and its correct use in producing technically sound works of art. Emphasizes the student's artistic growth and development.

Prerequisite: ART 111.6, ART 222.3

Note: Painting students must provide their own painting materials. Students with credit for ART 271 or 272 or 211 may not take this course for credit.

Syllabus: Click Here 

 

Art 221.3 (96)

Drawing and Related Work II B

 CRN: 29277

Term: 2 (3 Tutorial hours)

 Time: Wednesdays, 4:00pm - 6:50pm 

Professor: Grant McConnell

Description:

Continued identification of concepts and methods as they relate to visual perception and expression through drawing, compositional design, graphic media and skills. Use of diverse media coupled with invented and observed form is encouraged. 

Prerequisite: ART 112.6, ART 220.3
Note: Drawing students must provide their own drawing materials. Students with credit for ART 212, ART 281 or 282 may not take this course for credit.

Syllabus: Click Here

Art History

Art History 120.3 (97)

Introduction to History of Art I

 CRN: 85495

Term: 1 (3 Lecture hours)

 Time: Wednesdays, 1:00pm - 3:50pm  

Professor: Grant McConnell

Description:

This introductory class explores the production, dissemination and consumption of art, architecture and visual culture up to and including the 1600s. In a series of case studies drawn from differing cultures and geographies both local and global, it will consider a range of questions including: What is the role of the artist, builder and designer in society? What are the media, genres and contexts for communicating thought, and how and when do they engage in cultural, social and political action (if they do)? What does it take for art and visual culture to open up a space for relating to the world we live in, differently? How does the study of art, architecture and visual culture from the past generate curiosity, expand understandings, and ask new questions, in the present moment? This class will engage with these and other demanding questions. 

Note:

Students with credit for ART 110 may not take this course for credit.  This class is offered every second year.

Syllabus: Click here

Art History 121.3 (96)

Introduction to History of Art II

 CRN: 25939

Term: 2 (3 Lecture hours)

 Time: Wednesdays, 1:00pm - 3:50pm 

Professor: Grant McConnell

Description:

This course is great for students interested in how our visual culture came to be. The art which follows the Renaissance is central to our understanding of all things visual in the present day: contemporary design, architecture, digital imagery, commercial and fine art, etc. Documentaries, short videos and image projections animate our classroom lectures. The working lives of the artists are considered, (ie. how do artists and creative people make a living?). We look at the great art of the past and how it continues to influence the present.

Note:

Students with credit for ART 110 may not take this course for credit.  This class is offered every second year.

Syllabus: Click here

Biology

Biology 120.3 (97)

The Nature of Life

 CRN: 82455 

 See below for Lab CRNs 

Term: 1 (3 Lecture and 3 Lab Practicum hours)

 Time: Tuesdays, 9:00am - 11:50am 

 Lab Time: Tuesdays, 1:00pm - 3:50pm

 OR Tuesdays, 4:00pm - 6:50pm

Professor: Kim Cross

Description:

Biology 120 is one of two foundation courses for biological sciences and other related fields.  Biology 120 focuses on cellular life and introduces ideas of cell origins, cell structures, DNA, cell division, genetics and metabolism.  But enough of that boring stuff.  Biology 120 will try to answer questions like:

  • Why you appear differently from your parents, yet you share some of their features?
  • Why animals are addicted to oxygen?
  • Why green algae and plants may be the true inventors of cement (not the Romans)?
  • How do cells generate energy similarly to energy generation from a hydroelectric dam?
  • How can you “cook” meat without heat?

If you are curious about the life of cells, Biology 120 is the course for you.

Prerequisites:

Biology 30 or BIOL 107 or BIOL 108. Chemistry 30 is strongly recommended.

Note:

Students with credit for BIOL 110 will not receive credit for BIOL 120. Students must also register for a lab.

Lab (97)

Time: Tuesdays, 1:00pm - 3:50pm

 CRN: 82457 

Lab (98)

Time: Tuesdays, 4:00pm - 6:50pm

 CRN: 83590 

Syllabus: Click here

 

Biology 102.1

Nature for Engineering

 CRN: 

Term: 1 (1.5 Lecture hours and 1.5 Practicum/Lab hours)

 Time: 

Professor:

Description:

Human activity is altering environments and biodiversity with profound effects on ecosystems. This course will explore foundational principles of ecology and the causes, consequences and solutions to questions about anthropogenic changes in biodiversity and ecosystems.

Restricted to students in the College of Engineering.

 

Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): 

GE 102.2

Syllabus:

Biology 121.3 (96)

The Diversity of Life

 CRN: 22644 

  Lab CRN: 22645 

Term: 2 (3 Lecture and 3 Lab Practicum Hours)

 Time: Tuesdays, 9:00am - 11:50am 

 Lab Time: Tuesdays, 1:00pm - 3:50pm 

Professor: Kim Cross

Description:

Biology 121 is the second foundation course for biological sciences and other related fields.  As a complimentary course for Biology 120, Biology 121 focuses on the bigger picture – the diversity of life.  This course will answer questions like:  what is life, where did life come from, what currently influences life, and where life will be in the future?  Biology 121 will challenge your knowledge of the world around you, asking other questions like:

  • Why do plants need help from animals to have sex?
  • Why is a cucumber really a fruit?
  • What is a species, really?
  • Why does a chicken lay an egg, and why do some mammals also lay eggs?
  • Why does rainfall promote forests, and why do forests promote rainfall?
  • Why do some animals purposely eat toxic plants, and why are those same animals often colourful?
  • Why do fungi and bacteria like feces (poop)?

If you love life, Biology 121 is the course for you.

Prerequisites:

Biology 30 or BIOL 107 or BIOL 108.

Note:

Students with credit for BIOL 110 will not receive credit for BIOL 120. Students must also register for a lab.

Lab (96)

Time: Tuesdays, 1:00pm - 3:50pm

 CRN: 22645 

Syllabus: Click here

 

 

Biology 224.3 (96)

Animal Body Systems

 CRN: 23021 

 Lab CRN: 23025 

Term: 2 (3 Lecture and 3 Lab Practicum hours)

 Time: Thursdays, 9:00am - 11:50am 

 Lab Time: Thursdays, 1:00pm - 3:50pm 

Professor: Kim Cross

Description:

Biology 224 will introduce you to physiology.  What is physiology?  Simply, it is how your body works.  Biology 224 will answer questions like:

  • Why does your heart rate go up when you see someone you like?
  • On a cold day, why do your hands get cold before your body core gets cold?
  • Why is it difficult to feel your clothes after wearing them for a few moments?  In addition, why you are suddenly aware of your clothes after reading that statement?
  • Why do we urinate, but insects and birds do not?
  • Why do we have reflexes and how they work?
  • Why do our lungs have the surface area of a tennis court, and why does our small intestine have the surface area of a football field?

If you have ever thought of these questions, or have any other questions about animal bodily functions, consider taking Biology 224.

Prerequisites:

BIOL 120.3.

Note:

BIOL 121 is strongly recommended. Students with credit for BIOL 203 or BIOL 217 or HSC 208 will not receive credit for BIOL 224.

Lab (96)

Time: Thursdays, 1:00pm - 3:50pm

 CRN: 23025 

Syllabus: Click here

Chemical Engineering

CHE 113.3

Unit Operations in Chemical Process Engineering

 CRN: 

Term: 2 (1.5 Lecture hours & 1.5 Practicum/Lab hours)

 Time: 

Professor: 

Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): 

GE 163.2 and MATH 134.3

Description:

This course is designed to introduce first year students to the building block of chemical engineering processes: the unit operation. The fundamentals of chemical plant design, process flow diagrams, and unit operations will be illustrated both by lecture and by laboratory experiments. The lecture component will focus on full-scale equipment used in industry and, in parallel, experiments using some of that same equipment will be undertaken at the bench-scale. A bench-scale batch chemical plant will be built along with a paper-design of a full-scale plant. The course will culminate in a field trip to an industrial plant.

Restricted to students in the College of Engineering.

Syllabus:

Chemistry

CHEM 112.3 (97)

General Chemistry I: Structure, Bonding & Properties of Materials

 CRN: 81151  

 See below for Lab CRNs 

Term: 1 (3 Lecture & 3 1/2 Lab Practicum hours)

 Time: Wednesdays, 1:00pm - 3:50pm 

 Lab Time: Wednesdays, 4:00pm - 6:50pm 

 OR Wednesdays, 7:00pm - 9:50pm 

Professor: Anna Szmigielski

Prerequisite(s):

Chemistry 30 and (Mathematics B30 or Foundations of Mathematics 30 or Pre-Calculus 30).

Description:

Chemistry is everywhere in the world around you! It's in the food you eat, clothes you wear, water you drink, medicines you take, air you breathe, cleaners you use... you name it. Chemistry sometimes is called the "central science" because it connects to other sciences, such as biology, physics, geology and environmental science. Since everything is made of chemicals, you could consider chemistry to be the study of everything.


Chem 112 is the introductory General Chemistry class that covers structure, bonding and properties of materials. It involves lectures, laboratories and on-line assignments, and is recommended for students who intend to pursue career in science.


The optimist sees the glass half full.
The pessimist sees the glass half empty.
The chemist sees the glass completely full, half in the liquid state and half in the vapor state.

Note:

Students with credit for CHEM 111 or 114 may not take this course for credit.

Lab (96)

Time: Wednesdays, 4:00pm - 6:50pm

 CRN: 87510 

Lab (97)

Time: Wednesdays, 7:00pm - 9:50pm

 CRN: 81152 

Syllabus: Click here

 

CHEM 142.1

Global Impact of Chemistry for Engineering

 CRN: 

Term: 

 Time:  

Professor: 

Prerequisite(s): Chemistry 30 or CHEM 90 or CHEM 100; and Mathematics B30 or Foundations of Mathematics 30 or Pre-Calculus 30.

Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): GE 102.2

Description:

The course is intended as a brief introduction to general chemistry topics with emphasis on the greenhouse effect utilizing both qualitative and quantitative aspects of chemistry to investigate this global issue. You will learn practical applications of chemistry through course material and laboratory experiments.

Restricted to students in the College of Engineering.

Syllabus:

CHEM 250.3 (96)

Introduction to Organic Chemistry

 CRN: 21105 

 Lab CRN: 21106 

Term: 2 (3 Lecture & 3 Lab Practicum hours)

 Time: Wednesdays, 1:00pm - 3:50pm 

 Lab Time: Wednesdays, 4:00pm - 6:50pm 

Professor: Anna Szmigielski

Prerequisites:

CHEM 112 or 114

Description:

An introduction to organic chemistry; students will learn to name organic compounds, predict some of the properties and reactivity of compounds based on molecular structure, and grasp the importance of these concepts and their application to all sciences and life in general. Almost all the reactions in living matter involve organic compounds, and it is impossible to understand the molecular processes of living systems without knowing organic chemistry. CHEM 250.3 is intended as a basis for other courses, and a beginning for understanding organic and bio-organic chemistry. The laboratory will introduce students to basic chemical laboratory skills frequently used in organic chemistry.

Note:

The introductory CHEM courses were changed in 2002. Students with credit for CHEM 111 may take CHEM 250. Students with credit for CHEM 251 may not take CHEM 250 for credit. 

Lab (98)

Time: Wednesdays, 4:00pm - 6:50pm

Syllabus: Click here

 

CHEM 146.3

General Chemistry for Engineering

 CRN: 

 Lab CRN: 

Term: 2 (3 Lecture & 3 Lab Practicum hours)

 Time: 9:00am - 11:50am 

 Lab: 1:00pm - 3:50pm 

Professor:

Prerequisites:

 (Chemistry 30 or CHEM 90 or CHEM 100) and (Mathematics B30 or Foundations of Mathematics 30 or PreCalculus 30) and CHEM 142.1.

Description:

The course is intended to provide Engineering students with a fundamental understanding of core Chemistry concepts including equilibria and chemical thermodynamics. These goals are achieved and exemplified using an overarching theme of the role of carbon dioxide in the global climate change crisis.

Restricted to students in the College of Engineering.

Note:

Students with credit for CHEM 115 may not take this course for credit.

Lab 

Time: 1:00pm - 3:50pm

 CRN: 

Syllabus: 

Civil, Geological and Environmental Engineering

CE 271.2

Spring Surveying Camp

 CRN:

Term: 

 Time: 

Professor:

Prerequisite(s):

 CE 201 or CE 202

Description:

Basic introduction to the use and adjustments of survey equipment, and the associated field work and data interpretation required for engineering projects.

Restricted to students in the College of Engineering.

Note:

This is a two-week field camp immediately following second term (T2) final examinations.

Syllabus: 

Computer Science


CMPT 142.3 

Introduction to Computer Science for Engineers

 

 CRN: 

Term: 1 (1.5 Lecture hours and 1.5 Practicum/Lab hours)

 

 Time: 

Professor: 

Prerequisite(s): 

Mathematics B30 or Foundations of Mathematics 30 or Pre-Calculus 30.

Description: 

Introduces essential computer science and computer programming concepts and principles, with application to problems relevant to all Engineering disciplines. Presents the context in which computational problem solving is done, including historical and elementary technical aspects. Emphasizes fundamental programming constructs, including data and data types, variables and expressions, conditional branching, repetition, functions, recursion, as well as data structures such as strings, lists, and dictionaries. Presents searching and sorting algorithms as an introduction to concepts in computer science. Emphasis throughout on the practice of basic skills needed for writing robust software, including formal design processes and documentation, internal code documentation, testing, and debugging.

Note: Students with credit for CMPT 141 may not receive credit for this course.

Syllabus:

CMPT 146.3

Principles of Computer Science for Engineers (Computer and Electrical Engineering, and Engineering Physics)

 CRN:

Term: 2 (1.5 Lecture hours and 1.5 Practicum/Lab hours)

 Time: 

Professor: 

Prerequisite(s): 

CMPT 141.3 or CMPT 142.3

Description:

Introduces computer science principles and strategies for writing correct, efficient, robust, maintainable software. Presents principles and implementations of linear data structures including stacks, queues, and linked-lists, as well as recursive data structures including binary trees, and binary search trees. Introduces algorithm analysis to determine time and space requirements, including best-case and worst-case behaviour. Presents abstract data types as implemented using object-oriented programming. Emphasizes principles of software design, development, and testing, and practical development strategies, including defensive programming, version control, and good coding style.

Restricted to students in the College of Engineering.

Note: Students with credit for CMPT 145 may not receive credit for this course.

Syllabus: 

Cree

CREE 110.3 (97)

nehiyawetan Let Us Speak Cree

 CRN: 86173 

Term: 1 (3 Lecture hours)

 Time: Tuesdays, 7:00pm - 9:50pm 

Professor:

Description:

Presents the elements of the grammar and vocabulary of Cree as spoken in central Canada and will introduce the oral literary tradition associated with it. Its objective will be to develop elementary competence in the language and a basic acquaintance with Cree culture and traditions. Students will work with the Cree Sound System and learn how to read and pronounce the Cree words given throughout. The course will cover: nouns, verbs, pronouns, asking questions and responding, conjugating verbs, time, numbers, and basic sentence structure. Students will be expected to familiarize themselves with Cree and/or Aboriginal Language and Culture resources within their community. 

Note: 

Students with credit for CREE 101.6 may not take this course for credit. This course will begin with an activity to ensure students can use the electronic devices as required to throughout the semester.

Syllabus:

 

Drama

Drama 118.3 (96)

Acting I

 CRN: 27849 

Term: 2 (1 Lecture and 2 Practical hours)

 Time: Fridays, 9:00am - 11:50am 

 

Professor: Angus Ferguson

Description:

The essentials of acting through the exploration of body, voice, idea, and imagination.

Note:

Students with credit for DRAM 116 may not take DRAM 118 for credit.

Syllabus: 

 

Economics

Econ 111.3 (97)

Price Theory and Resource Allocation

 CRN: 81162 

Term: 1 (3 Lecture hours)

 Time: Tuesdays, 1:00pm - 3:50pm 

Professor: Nancy Lee

Description:

Shows the student how to understand the individual consumption and production decisions which are made within a market economy, guided by prices and costs. Economic concepts of supply, demand, cost, response to price changes, production, equilibrium, and income distribution are analyzed.

Syllabus: Click here

Econ 114.3 (96)

Money and Income

 CRN: 21122 

Term: 2 (3 Lecture hours)

 Time: Wednesdays, 1:00pm - 3:50pm 

Professor: Nancy Lee

Prerequisites:

ECON 111 recommended

Description:

Shows the student how to understand the collective problems in economic policy, and the choices which face a modern economy. Social accounting, national income, consumption, saving, government spending, taxation, investment, interest rates, money and banking, foreign trade, and balance of payments are analyzed.

Syllabus: Click here

Education

 

EDLC 101.0 (97)

Education Learning Community at SPC

 CRN: 86709 

Term: 1 (3 Lecture hours)

 Time: Mondays, 9:00am - 11:50am 

Professor:

Description:

In this course, first year direct entry Education students will meet as a Learning Community once per week over the course of the fall term. Students will be guided by mentors who will help to co-create a sense of belonging to the College of Education and to the wider campus community. This 0-credit course will encourage Education students to develop their local understandings of differentiated learning and professionalism in the context of their local learning environment at SPC. To achieve these ends, each Learning Community will learn about and engage with educational partners and faculty members who will connect conceptual ideas with examples and innovations that exist in schools.

Restriction(s): Restricted to students in the College of Education.

Syllabus:

 

EDFT 101.3 (W97)

Introduction to Education

 CRN: 86755

Term: 1 (Online)

 Time: Online

Professor:

Description:

Lays foundations for the study of education and pedagogy. The equity component presents a moral basis for questioning personal attitudes and public practices concerning race, gender, exceptionalities, and class. The epistemological component provides a context for understanding the learning process and curriculum development.

Restriction(s): Restricted to students in the College of Education.

Syllabus:

EDLC 102.0 (96)

Education Learning Community in the Muenster Area

 CRN: 27300 

Term: 2 (3 Lecture hours)

 Time: Wednesdays, 7:00pm - 9:50pm 

Professor:

Description:

In this course, first year direct entry Bachelor of Education students will meet as a Learning Community once per week over the course of the winter term. Students will be guided by mentors who will help to co-create a sense of belonging to the College of Education and to the wider Muenster area. This 0-credit course will encourage Education students to expand on their local understandings of teacher leadership, curricula, instructional strategies and culturally relevant pedagogy.

Restriction(s): Restricted to students in the College of Education.

Syllabus:

 

EPSE 202.3 (W96)

Psychological Foundations of Teaching and Learning

 CRN: 27345

Term: 2 (Online)

 Time: Online

Professor:

Description:

Drawing on the knowledge base in the field of Educational Psychology, teacher candidates will develop an understanding of: the characteristics of learners and the learning process in childhood and adolescence; and how to best meet students' diverse learning needs (i.e., cognitive, emotional, social, physical, academic, cultural and age-specific) through a variety of teaching-learning models, assessment methods, and instructional strategies.

Restriction(s): Restricted to students in the College of Education.

Note:  

Students can only receive credit for one of the following courses: EPSE 202, EPSE 302, EDUC 302, or EPSE 258.

Syllabus:

English


ENG 113.3 (97)

Literature and Composition Reading Narrative

 CRN: 81106 

Term: 1 (3 Lecture hours)

 Time: Mondays, 6:00pm - 8:50pm 

Professor:

Description:

An introduction to the major forms of narrative literature in English. In addition to learning the tools of critical analysis, students will study and practice composition.

Syllabus: Click here

 

ENG 114.3 (96)

Literature and Composition Reading Culture

 CRN: 20997 

Term: 2 (3 Lecture hours)

 Time: Wednesdays, 9:00am - 11:50am 

Professor: 

Description:

An introduction to historical and contemporary cultural forms in English. In addition to learning the tools of critical analysis, students will study and practise composition.

Note:

Only 6 credit units of 100-Level English may be taken for credit.

Syllabus: Click here

 

 

General Engineering

GE 102.2

Introduction to Engineering I

 CRN: 

Term: 1 (1.5 Lecture hours and 1.5 Practicum/Lab hours)

 Time: 

Professor: 

Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): 

BIOL 102.1; GEOL 102.1; PHYS 152.1; and CHEM 142.1

Description:

This course includes two concurrent modules. Module 1 introduces students to the profession of engineering and life as an engineering student. The course will allow students to learn, apply and reflect upon strategies for success in engineering in areas including: well-being, group dynamics, conflict resolution, time management, goal setting, planning, studying, problem solving and academic honesty. Module 2 introduces students to important aspects of the culture and worldviews of Indigenous Peoples and contextualizes the engineering profession within those worldviews. The course will introduce students to the engineer’s legal and moral duty to consult with affected communities and examples of historical and contemporary influences of Indigenous worldviews on technology and engineering design. There is also discussion about the importance of inclusion of, and respect for, all people.

Restricted to students in the College of Engineering.

Syllabus:

 

GE 112.1

Engineering Discipline Experience

 CRN: 

Term: 1 (1.5 Lecture hours and 1.5 Practicum/Lab hours)

 Time: 

Professor: 

Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s):

GE 102.2

Description:

This course will provide students with an opportunity to have a meaningful experience for engineering programs offered at the University of Saskatchewan. Students will attend lectures, seminars, and/or laboratory experiences for a total of 6 hours per day for each of the five days. Students will work individually and/or in groups to perform course activities.

Restricted to students in the College of Engineering.

Syllabus: 

 

GE 122.2

Engineering Mechanics I

 CRN: 

 Lab CRN: 

Term: 1 (1.5 Lecture hours and 1.5 Practicum/Lab hours)

 Time: 

 Lab Time: 

Professor: 

Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s):

GE 102.2 and MATH 133.4

Description:

This course considers particle dynamics and begins with particle kinematics under arbitrary acceleration. Particle kinetics is then addressed including force-acceleration, work-energy, and impulse-momentum principles. A series of practical laboratories are designed to help the student apply the principles of dynamics to practical problems.

Restricted to students in the College of Engineering.

Note: Students with credit for GE 125 will not receive credit for this course.

Lab 

Time:

 CRN: 

Syllabus:

 

GE 132.1

Engineering Communications I

 CRN: 

 

Term: 1 1 (1.5 Lecture hours and 1.5 Practicum/Lab hours)

 Time: 

Professor: 

Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s):

GE 102.2

Description:

This course introduces students to written Technical Communication and to Drawing & Sketching. The Technical Communication I module focuses on developing students’ communication awareness in the areas of referencing, coherency, and editing. The Drawing & Sketching module focuses on 2D and 3D isometric and orthographic drawings, as well as dimensioning and scaling.

Restricted to students in the College of Engineering.

Note: Students with credit for GE 121 will not receive credit for this course.

Syllabus:

 

GE 142.2

Design I

 CRN:

Term: 1 (1.5 Lecture hours and 1.5 Practicum/Lab hours)

 Time:

Professor: 

 Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s):

 GE 102.2 and GE 132.1

Description:

This course introduces students to Engineering Design. The Design I course focuses on the early stages of design characterized by problem identification, acceptance, definition, and characterization. This will include the determination of design functions, criteria/objectives and constraints/requirements. Students will engage in a group project to identify and characterize an engineering design problem of their own choosing.

Restricted to students in the College of Engineering.

Note: Students with credit for GE 121 will not receive credit for this course.

Syllabus:

 

GE 152.1

Electrical Circuits 1

 CRN:

Term: 1 (1.5 Lecture hours and 1.5 Practicum/Lab hours)

 Time:

Professor: 

Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): 

GE 102.2 and MATH 133.4 and CMPT 142.3

Description:

This course includes two concurrent modules. Module 1 introduces students to basic properties of direct-current electrical circuits: voltage, current, resistance and power. Students will learn to analyze series and parallel resistive direct-current circuits by applying: Kirchoff’s laws, Ohm’s law, mesh and node analysis, superposition and Thevenin’s and Norton’s Theorems. Module 2 introduces students to computation and programming using Matlab. Students will learn the Matlab interface and how to conduct I/O, plot data in 2 and 3 dimensions and solve linear systems using matrix data types. Students will apply programming skills to create programs and user-defined functions. Students will be introduced to advanced features available in Matlab.

Restricted to students in the College of Engineering.

Note: Students with credit for EE 204 will not receive credit for this course.

Syllabus:

GE 103.1

Introduction to Engineering II

 CRN: 

 Lab CRN: 

Term: 2 (1.5 Lecture hours and 1.5 Practicum/Lab hours)

 Time: 

 Lab Time: 

Professor: 

Prerequisites:

GE 102.2.

Description:

This course introduces the history and scope of the engineering profession, including the concepts of professionalism and ethics. Students will discover the academic and career options available to them and will set out their career goals and a plan to reach them. Students will also complete health and safety training relevant to engineering practice.

Restricted to students in the College of Engineering.

Lab 

Time:

 CRN: 

Syllabus: 

 

GE 123.3

Engineering Mechanics II

 CRN:

Term: 2 (1.5 Lecture hours and 1.5 Practicum/Lab hours)

 Time:

Professor: 

Prerequisite(s) and Corequisite(s):

GE 122.2 and MATH 134.3

Description:

This course is an introduction to statics for particles and rigid bodies in two and three dimensions. Applications involving the analyses of simple trusses, frames, and machines are introduced. Dry friction is also introduced. A series of practical laboratories are designed to help the student apply the principles of statics to practical problems.

Restricted to students in the College of Engineering.

Note: Students with credit for GE 124 will not receive credit for this course.

Lab 

Time: 

Syllabus

 

GE 133.2

Engineering Communication II

 CRN:

Term: 2 (1.5 Lecture hours and 1.5 Practicum/Lab hours)

 Time:

Professor: 

Prerequisite(s) and Corequisite(s):

GE 103.1 and GE 132.1

Description:

This course introduces students to oral technical communication (including teaching), CAD, poster presentations, and technical research. The Technical Communication II module focuses on developing oral communication skills and self/peer teaching abilities. The CAD module introduces students to AuotCAD and basic CAD skills. The Technical Communication III module focuses on report editing and technical poster presentation, while the Research module introduces students to literature reviews, and basic data analyses of data sets from real research labs.

Restricted to students in the College of Engineering.

Lab 

Time:

Syllabus

 

GE 143.2

Design II

 CRN: 

Term: 2 (1.5 Lecture hours and 1.5 Practicum/Lab hours)

 Time: 

Professor: 

Prerequisite(s) and Corequisite(s):

GE 103.1 and GE 133.2 and GE 142.2

Description:

This course introduces students to Engineering Design, building on the Design I course. Design II focuses on the later stages of conceptual design characterized by ideation, concept evaluation, and concept selection. In groups, students will undertake one of a set of design problems from a variety of engineering disciplines, including multidisciplinary problems. Ultimately, students will implement a proof of concept of their solution, and they will present their progress in a Design Recommendation Report.

Restricted to students in the College of Engineering.

Note: This course is not taken by students entering Civil, Geological and Environmental Engineering majors.

Lab 

Time:

Syllabus

 

GE 153.2

Electrical Circuits II

 CRN:

Term: 2 (1.5 Lecture hours and 1.5 Practicum/Lab hours)

 Time:

Professor: 

Prerequisite(s) and Corequisite(s):

GE 152.1 and MATH 134.3 and PHYS 156.3

Description:

This course focuses on the analysis of basic alternating-current (AC) electrical circuits and the calculation of the flow of real, reactive and apparent power. There is also exploration of other electrical engineering topics, including electrical safety, power distribution systems, batteries and energy storage, electric motors and generators, and renewable power generation systems.

Restricted to students in the College of Engineering.

Note: Students with credit for EE 204 will not receive credit for this course.

Lab 

Time: 

Syllabus

 

GE 163.2

Process Engineering

 CRN: 

 Lab CRN: 

Term: 2 (1.5 Lecture hours and 1.5 Practicum/Lab hours)

 Time:

 Lab Time: 

Professor: 

Prerequisite(s) and Corequisite(s):

GE 152.1 and MATH 134.3 and CHEM 146.3

Description:

This course presents the concepts of process engineering and applies them to a wide array of systems. Basic process engineering tools are developed in the first half of the course that are then used to solve complex process systems in the second half. The course is designed to appeal to many sectors of the engineering profession. Examples are taken from many process systems including, but not limited to: manufacturing; geological systems; health care; food production; environmental systems; financial systems; biological systems; water treatment; and unit operations.

Restricted to students in the College of Engineering.

Lab 

Time: 

 CRN: 

Syllabus

Geology

GEOL 102.1

Introduction to Geology for Engineering

 CRN: 

Term: 1

 Time: 

Professor:

Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): 

GE 102.2

Description:

Introductory exploration of the Earth system for engineering students. The aim of the course is to provide students with an appreciation of global and local-scale geological processes and the influence of these processes on the Earth system through geologic time. Key topics will include plate tectonics, geologic time, the rock cycle, weathering and erosion, geologic hazards, mineral resources, and Earth science careers. Students will learn practical applications of rock and mineral identification through laboratory activities.

Restricted to students in the College of Engineering.

Syllabus: