Agriculture

Agriculture 111.3 (W97)

Agricultural Science I

                CRN: 80257

Term: 1 (online)

Time: Online

Description:

An introduction to agricultural systems illustrating the interactions between plant, animal, microbial, human and environment components. The soil/plant/environment interface is emphasized.  Management decisions affecting cropping and land use are examined.

Syllabus:

Agriculture 112.3 (W96)

Agriculture Science II

      CRN: 24640

Term: 2 (online)

Time: Online

Description:

An introduction to agricultural systems and the interactions between microbial, plant, animal, and human components. The emphasis is on issues and problems associated with animal production, value-added processing, marketing and the consumption of food.

Syllabus:

 

Agriculture 113.3 (W96)

Agri Food Issues and Institutions

                CRN: 26633

Term: 2 (online)

Time: Online

Description:

Examines the institutional setting within which the agri-food sector operates, as well as the drivers that affect this setting. Attention is paid to changes in the demand for food and bio-based products, the changing nature of production, and long-term trends in productivity, prices, employment and trade. The course examines the manner in which decisions about technology adoption, employment, diversification, R&D expenditures, and government policy are made; the institutions (e.g., laws, contracts, social norms, markets) that govern this decision making; the social, legal, political and economic factors that affect these institutions; as well as the implications for the agri-food sector of decisions made.

Prerequisite(s): ECON 111.

Syllabus:

Art

Art 111.6 (97)

Painting Foundation

Term 1 CRN: 80895

Term 2 CRN: 20778

Term: 1 & 2 (2 tutorial and 2 practicum hours)

Time: Every Second Saturday, 10:00 am - 3:50 pm

Professor: Clint Hunker

Description:

Explores the principles and elements of the language of art as related to the process of painting. Discussion and exposure to a variety of tools, materials and media will be included. Historical reference to stylistic changes and various aesthetic concepts will be explored.

Syllabus: Click Here

 

Art 112.6 (97)

Drawing 1 Foundation

Term 1 CRN: 81143

Term 2 CRN: 21094

Term: 1 & 2 (3 tutorial hours)

Time: Wednesdays, 4:00 pm - 6:50 pm

Professor: Grant McConnell

Description:

Learning to draw through the fundamentals offered in university instruction is one of the most satisfying experiences you will have in your education. We cover the basics of form in drawing, including the Elements of Art and the Principles of Design. In our studio environment at SPC we can offer a wide range of subject matter, from still life and figure drawing through to extended media investigations in drawing. Enhanced with in-class lectures and image presentations of the works of well-known artists, most of our class time involves active drawing. A supportive studio class environment is strongly emphasized. 

Note:

Drawing students must provide their own drawing materials.

Syllabus: Click Here

Art 222.3 (97)

Painting and Related Work II A

CRN: 88635

Term: 1 & 2 (2 tutorial and 2 practicum hours)

Time: Every Second Saturday 10:00am-3:50pm

Professor: Clint Hunker

Description:

Continued identification of concepts and methods as they relate to the expression, structure, media and skills of pictorial art. Students may experiment with painting media and work from any subject matter. Students must acquaint themselves with the materials of their craft and its correct use in producing technically sound works of art. Emphasizes the student's artistic growth and development.

Prerequisite: ART 111.6 
Note: Painting students must provide their own painting materials. Students with credit for ART 271 or 272 or 211 may not take this course for credit.

Syllabus: Click Here 

 

Art 220.3 (97)

Drawing and Related Work II A

CRN: 88634

Term: 1 & 2 (3 tutorial hours)

Time: Wednesdays, 4:00 pm - 6:50 pm

Professor: Grant McConnell

Description:

Continued identification of concepts and methods as they relate to visual perception and expression through drawing, compositional design, graphic media and skills. Use of diverse media coupled with invented and observed form is encouraged.

Prerequisite: ART 112.6
Note: Drawing students must provide their own drawing materials. Students with credit for ART 212, ART 281 or 282 may not take this course for credit.

Syllabus: Click Here

Art 223.3 (96)

Painting and Related Work II B

CRN: 29278

Term: 1 & 2 (2 tutorial and 2 practicum hours)

Time: Every Second Saturday 10:00am-3:50pm

Professor: Clint Hunker

Description:

Continued identification of concepts and methods as they relate to the expression, structure, media and skills of pictorial art. Students may experiment with painting media and work from any subject matter. Students must acquaint themselves with the materials of their craft and its correct use in producing technically sound works of art. Emphasizes the student's artistic growth and development.

Prerequisite: ART 111.6, ART 222.3

Note: Painting students must provide their own painting materials. Students with credit for ART 271 or 272 or 211 may not take this course for credit.

Syllabus: Click Here 

 

Art 221.3 (96)

Drawing and Related Work II B

CRN: 29277

Term: 1 & 2 (3 tutorial hours)

Time: Wednesdays, 4:00 pm - 6:50 pm

Professor: Grant McConnell

Description:

Continued identification of concepts and methods as they relate to visual perception and expression through drawing, compositional design, graphic media and skills. Use of diverse media coupled with invented and observed form is encouraged. 

Prerequisite: ART 112.6, ART 220.3
Note: Drawing students must provide their own drawing materials. Students with credit for ART 212, ART 281 or 282 may not take this course for credit.

Syllabus: Click Here

Art History

Art History 120.3 (97)

Introduction to History of Art I

CRN: 85495

Term: 1 (3 lecture hours)

Time: Wednesdays, 1pm-3:50pm  

Professor: Grant McConnell

Description:

This introductory class explores the production, dissemination and consumption of art, architecture and visual culture up to and including the 1600s. In a series of case studies drawn from differing cultures and geographies both local and global, it will consider a range of questions including: What is the role of the artist, builder and designer in society? What are the media, genres and contexts for communicating thought, and how and when do they engage in cultural, social and political action (if they do)? What does it take for art and visual culture to open up a space for relating to the world we live in, differently? How does the study of art, architecture and visual culture from the past generate curiosity, expand understandings, and ask new questions, in the present moment? This class will engage with these and other demanding questions. 

Note:

Students with credit for ART 110 may not take this course for credit.  This class is offered every second year.

Syllabus: Click here

Art History 121.3 (97)

Introduction to History of Art II

CRN: 25939

Term: 2 (3 lecture hours)

Time: Wednesdays, 1pm-3:50pm  

Professor: Grant McConnell

Description:

This course is great for students interested in how our visual culture came to be. The art which follows the Renaissance is central to our understanding of all things visual in the present day: contemporary design, architecture, digital imagery, commercial and fine art, etc. Documentaries, short videos and image projections animate our classroom lectures. The working lives of the artists are considered, (ie. how do artists and creative people make a living?). We look at the great art of the past and how it continues to influence the present.

Note:

Students with credit for ART 110 may not take this course for credit.  This class is offered every second year.

Syllabus: 

Biology

Biology 120.3 (97)

The Nature of Life

CRN: 82455

See below for Lab CRNs

Term: 1 (3 lecture and 3 lab practicum hours)

Time: Tuesdays, 9:00 am - 11:50 am

Lab Time: Tuesdays, 1pm - 3:50pm OR

Tuesdays, 4pm - 6:50pm

Professor:

Description:

Biology 120 is one of two foundation courses for biological sciences and other related fields.  Biology 120 focuses on cellular life and introduces ideas of cell origins, cell structures, DNA, cell division, genetics and metabolism.  But enough of that boring stuff.  Biology 120 will try to answer questions like:

  • Why you appear differently from your parents, yet you share some of their features?
  • Why animals are addicted to oxygen?
  • Why green algae and plants may be the true inventors of cement (not the Romans)?
  • How do cells generate energy similarly to energy generation from a hydroelectric dam?
  • How can you “cook” meat without heat?

If you are curious about the life of cells, Biology 120 is the course for you.

Prerequisites:

Biology 30 or BIOL 107 or BIOL 108. Chemistry 30 is strongly recommended.

Note:

Students with credit for BIOL 110 will not receive credit for BIOL 120. Students must also register for a lab.

Lab (98)

Time: Tuesdays, 1:00 pm – 3:50 pm

CRN: 82457 (Students registered in ENG 120 MUST register for this lab)

Lab (97)

Time: Tuesdays, 4pm-6:50pm

CRN: 83590

Syllabus: Click here

Biology 121.3 (96)

The Diversity of Life

CRN: 22644

 Lab CRN: 22645

Term: 2 (3 lecture and 3 lab practicum hours)

Time: Tuesdays, 9am-11:50am

Lab: Tuesdays, 1pm-3:50pm

Professor:

Description:

Biology 121 is the second foundation course for biological sciences and other related fields.  As a complimentary course for Biology 120, Biology 121 focuses on the bigger picture – the diversity of life.  This course will answer questions like:  what is life, where did life come from, what currently influences life, and where life will be in the future?  Biology 121 will challenge your knowledge of the world around you, asking other questions like:

  • Why do plants need help from animals to have sex?
  • Why is a cucumber really a fruit?
  • What is a species, really?
  • Why does a chicken lay an egg, and why do some mammals also lay eggs?
  • Why does rainfall promote forests, and why do forests promote rainfall?
  • Why do some animals purposely eat toxic plants, and why are those same animals often colourful?
  • Why do fungi and bacteria like feces (poop)?

If you love life, Biology 121 is the course for you.

Prerequisites:

Biology 30 or BIOL 107 or BIOL 108.

Note:

Students with credit for BIOL 110 will not receive credit for BIOL 120. Students must also register for a lab.

Lab (96)

Time: Tuesdays, 1pm-3:50pm

CRN: 22645

Syllabus:

 

 

Biology 224.3 (96)

Animal Body Systems

CRN: 23021

Lab CRN: 23025

Term: 2 (3 lecture and 3 lab practicum hours)

Time: Thursdays, 9am-11:50am

Lab: Thursdays, 1pm - 3:50pm

Professor: 

Description:

Biology 224 will introduce you to physiology.  What is physiology?  Simply, it is how your body works.  Biology 224 will answer questions like:

  • Why does your heart rate go up when you see someone you like?
  • On a cold day, why do your hands get cold before your body core gets cold?
  • Why is it difficult to feel your clothes after wearing them for a few moments?  In addition, why you are suddenly aware of your clothes after reading that statement?
  • Why do we urinate, but insects and birds do not?
  • Why do we have reflexes and how they work?
  • Why do our lungs have the surface area of a tennis court, and why does our small intestine have the surface area of a football field?

If you have ever thought of these questions, or have any other questions about animal bodily functions, consider taking Biology 224.

Prerequisites:

BIOL 120.3.

Note:

BIOL 121 is strongly recommended. Students with credit for BIOL 203 or BIOL 217 or HSC 208 will not receive credit for BIOL 224.

Lab (96)

Time: Thursday 1pm - 3:50pm

CRN: TBD

Syllabus: 

Chemistry

CHEM 112.3 (97)

General Chemistry I: Structure, Bonding & Properties of Materials

CRN: 81151

See below for Lab CRNs

Term: 1 (3 lecture & 3 1/2 lab practicum hours)

Time: Wednesdays, 1pm-3:50pm

Lab Time: Wednesdays, 4pm-6:50pm OR

Fridays, 1pm-3:50pm

Professor: 

Prerequisites:

Chemistry 30 and (Mathematics B30 or Foundations of Mathematics 30 or Pre-Calculus 30).

Description:

Chemistry is everywhere in the world around you! It's in the food you eat, clothes you wear, water you drink, medicines you take, air you breathe, cleaners you use... you name it. Chemistry sometimes is called the "central science" because it connects to other sciences, such as biology, physics, geology and environmental science. Since everything is made of chemicals, you could consider chemistry to be the study of everything.


Chem 112 is the introductory General Chemistry class that covers structure, bonding and properties of materials. It involves lectures, laboratories and on-line assignments, and is recommended for students who intend to pursue career in science.


The optimist sees the glass half full.
The pessimist sees the glass half empty.
The chemist sees the glass completely full, half in the liquid state and half in the vapor state.

Note:

Students with credit for CHEM 111 or 114 may not take this course for credit.

Lab (97)

Time: Wednesdays, 4pm-6:50pm

CRN: 87510 (Engineering students MUST register for this lab)

Lab (96)

Time: Fridays, 1pm-3:50pm

CRN: 81152

Syllabus: Click here

CHEM 250.3 (96)

Introduction to Organic Chemistry

CRN: 21105

Lab CRN: 21106

Term: 2 (3 lecture & 3 lab practicum hours)

Time: Wednesdays, 9am-11:50am

Lab: Wednesdays, 1pm-3:50pm

Professor:

Prerequisites:

CHEM 112 or 114

Description:

Chem 250 is the introductory Organic Chemistry class that covers fundamental facts about the structure, stereochemistry, chemical properties, and reactions of organic compounds. This class is recommended for students who plan to pursue careers in chemistry, biology, biochemistry or health sciences. To enhance the learning experience, lectures are accompanied with laboratories and on-line assignments.

Note:

The introductory CHEM courses were changed in 2002. Students with credit for CHEM 111 may take CHEM 250. Students with credit for CHEM 251 may not take CHEM 250 for credit. 

Lab (98)

Time: Wednesdays, 1pm-3:50pm 

CRN: TBD

Syllabus:

Computer Science

CMPT 140.3 (97)  

Introduction to Creative Computing

CRN: 86706

Term: 1 (3 hour lecture & 1.5 hour lab)

Time: Mondays, 4:00 pm - 6:50 pm (Lecture)
Mondays, 7:00 pm - 8:20 pm (Lab)

Professor: Ed Prokraka

Description:

We are, today, highly reliant upon using computer applications ("apps") in our work and leisure. This course provides an introduction to how apps are developed. Emerging applications of computing (information technology - IT) will also be examined. Concepts in computing such as algorithms, problem sloving, and programming are explored using interactive multimedia systems as the creative focus. Basic skills in problem solving, programming, design and interaction, event-based behaviour, and protyping are developed.

            

Note:

Recommended for students who do not have Computer Science 30 (or want to refresh their Computer Science 30 knowledge).

For students in most Arts and Sciences programs, CMPT 140 will count as a Science elective. For students in Interactive Systems Design, Computer Science, and Bioinformatics programs, CMPT 140 will count as an open elective.

Students wishing to major in Interactive Systems Design, Computer Science, and Bioinformatics programs can consider taking CMPT 141 instead of CMPT 140.

CMPT 140 can be taken for credit after the completion of CMPT 100, but CMPT 100 cannot be taken for credit after completion of CMPT 140. Students with credit for CMPT 105, CMPT 111, CMPT 113 or CMPT 116 cannot obtain credit for CMPT 140.

 

Syllabus:

Cree

CREE 110.3 (96)

nehiyawetan Let Us Speak Cree

CRN: 28485

Term: 2 (3 hour lecture)

Time: Tuesdays, 7pm-9:50pm

Professor:

Description:

Presents the elements of the grammar and vocabulary of Cree as spoken in central Canada and will introduce the oral literary tradition associated with it. Its objective will be to develop elementary competence in the language and a basic acquaintance with Cree culture and traditions. Students will work with the Cree Sound System and learn how to read and pronounce the Cree words given throughout. The course will cover: nouns, verbs, pronouns, asking questions and responding, conjugating verbs, time, numbers, and basic sentence structure. Students will be expected to familiarize themselves with Cree and/or Aboriginal Language and Culture resources within their community. 

Note: 

Students with credit for CREE 101.6 may not take this course for credit. This course will begin with an activity to ensure students can use the electronic devices as required to throughout the semester.

Syllabus:

 

Drama


Drama 118.3 (97)

Acting I

CRN:  

Term: 1 (1 lecture and 2 practical hours)

Time: MOVED TO TERM 2 FOR 2020/2021

 

Professor: Angus Ferguson

Description:

The essentials of acting through the exploration of body, voice, idea, and imagination.

Note:

Students with credit for DRAM 116 may not take DRAM 118 for credit.

Syllabus: 

Drama 118.3 

Acting I

CRN: 27849 

Term: 1 (1 lecture and 2 practical hours)

Time: Friday, 9am - 11:50 am

 

Professor: Angus Ferguson

Description:

The essentials of acting through the exploration of body, voice, idea, and imagination.

Note:

Students with credit for DRAM 116 may not take DRAM 118 for credit.

Syllabus: 

 

Drama 119.3 (96)

Acting II

CRN: 

Term: 2 (1 lecture and 2 practical hours)

Time: NOT OFFERED IN 2020/2021

Professor:

Prerequisites:

DRAM 116 or 118.

Description:

Fundamentals introduced in Acting 1 will be applied to the process of interpreting the dramatic text.

Note:

Students with credit for DRAM 117 may not take DRAM 119 for credit. 

Syllabus: 

Economics

Econ 111.3 (97)

Price Theory and Resource Allocation

CRN: 81162

Term: 1 (3 lecture hours)

Time: Thursdays, 1:00 pm - 3:50 pm

Professor: Nancy Lee

Description:

Exploring the principles of micro-economics, this course introduces students to the economist’s view of the world, including ideas of opportunity cost, marginal decision making, the gain from trade, and efficiency of market allocations. It discusses the role of assumptions in developing a theory which explains why individuals and nations trade. We will discuss who wins and who loses from trade and present the debts over protectionist trade policies.

We also introduce the basic tools of supply & demand and uses of these tools to explain government policies such as rental-control, minimum-wage laws, and tax incidence. The theory of consumer, producer and efficiency of market tells the students more about efficiency of market allocations. Why market allocations are desirable and how the government can improve on them, such as pollution render market outcomes inefficient.

The last part of the course discusses the behaviour of a firm with competitive markets, monopoly, monopolistic competition and oligopoly about their price and production. The purpose of this course is to help to learn the fundamental lessons of economics and to show such lessons can be applied to the world. We have various learning tools like case studies and updated Canadian “in the news” features. Quick quizzes, figures and tables, questions for review, and problems & applications.

Syllabus: Click here

Econ 114.3 (96)

Money and Income

CRN: 21122

Term: 2 (3 lecture hours)

Time:  Wednesday, 9am-11:50am

Professor: 

Prerequisites:

ECON 111 recommended

Description:

Macro-economics is to examine the economy in the long run. It discusses the meaning of GDP related statistics from national income accounts, the measures and use of the consumer price index, the determinants of the large variation in living standard over time and across countries.

We also discuss the type of financial institutions in our economy and their role in allocation resources, considering the long-run determinations of the unemployment rate. One part of this course is introducing the economist’s concept of money and role of central bank in controlling the quantity of money, and developing the classical theory of inflation and discusses the costs that inflation imposes on a society. We explain the relationship among saving, investment and the trade balance.

This course presents a classical model of the international flow of goods and capital. The model sheds light on various issues, including the link between budget deficits and trade deficits and effects of trade policies. It also explains why policymakers control aggregate demand face a trade-off between inflation and unemployment. The last part of this course turns to explaining short-run fluctuations around the long-run trend, some facts about the business cycle, and influence of monetary and fiscal policy on aggregate demand.

 The purpose of this course is to help to learn the fundamental lessons of economics and to show such lessons can be applied to the world. We have various learning tools like case studies, updated Canadian “in the news” features. Quick quizzes, figures and tables, questions for review, and problems & applications.

Syllabus:

Education

 

EDLC 101.0 (97)

Education Learning Community at SPC

CRN: 86709

Term: 1

Time: Thursday 1:00-3:50pm

Description:

In this course, first year direct entry Education students will meet as a Learning Community once per week over the course of the fall term. Students will be guided by mentors who will help to co-create a sense of belonging to the College of Education and to the wider campus community. This 0-credit course will encourage Education students to develop their local understandings of differentiated learning and professionalism in the context of their local learning environment at SPC. To achieve these ends, each Learning Community will learn about and engage with educational partners and faculty members who will connect conceptual ideas with examples and innovations that exist in schools.

Restriction(s): Restricted to students in the College of Education.

Syllabus:


EPSE 202.3

Psychological Foundations of Teaching and Learning

                               CRN: 88511

Term: 1 (online)

Time: Online

Description:

Drawing on the knowledge base in the field of Educational Psychology, teacher candidates will develop an understanding of: the characteristics of learners and the learning process in childhood and adolescence; and how to best meet students' diverse learning needs (i.e., cognitive, emotional, social, physical, academic, cultural and age-specific) through a variety of teaching-learning models, assessment methods, and instructional strategies.

Restriction(s): Restricted to students in the College of Education.
Note: Students can only receive credit for one of the following courses: EPSE 202, EPSE 302, EDUC 302, or EPSE 258.

Syllabus:

EDLC 102.0 (97)

Education Learning Community in the Muenster Area

CRN: 27300

Term: 1

Time: Tuesday 1:00-3:50 pm

Description:

In this course, first year direct entry Bachelor of Education students will meet as a Learning Community once per week over the course of the winter term. Students will be guided by mentors who will help to co-create a sense of belonging to the College of Education and to the wider Muenster area. This 0-credit course will encourage Education students to expand on their local understandings of teacher leadership, curricula, instructional strategies and culturally relevant pedagogy.

Restriction(s): Restricted to students in the College of Education.

Syllabus:

 

EDFT 101.3

Introduction to Education

CRN: 29160

Term: 2 (online)

Time: Online

Description:

Lays foundations for the study of education and pedagogy. The equity component presents a moral basis for questioning personal attitudes and public practices concerning race, gender, exceptionalities, and class. The epistemological component provides a context for understanding the learning process and curriculum development.

Restriction(s): Restricted to students in the College of Education.

Syllabus:

English


ENG 113.3 (97)

Literature and Composition Reading Narrative

CRN: 81106

Term: 1 (3 hour lecture)

Time: Mondays, 9am-11:50am

Professor: Barbara Langhorst

Description:

An introduction to the major forms of narrative literature in English. In addition to learning the tools of critical analysis, students will study and practice composition.

Syllabus: Click here


ENG 120.3 (97)

Introduction to Creative Writing

CRN: 86169

Term: 1 (1.5 hour lecture/1.5 hour workshop)

Time: Tuesdays, 4pm-6:50pm

Professor: Barbara Langhorst

Description:

This course introduces students to strategies for writing original fiction, poetry, and creative non-fiction. The course will include both lectures and writing workshops in which students critique original writing by class members. Visiting authors may be invited into the classroom, and students will be encouraged to attend literary events in the community. By the end of the course, students will have a portfolio of polished writing in three genres.

Syllabus: Click Here

ENG 308.3 (97)

Creative Nonfiction I

CRN: Not offered in 2020/2021

Term: 1

Time: Saturday, 10:00 am - 3:50 pm (Biweekly)

Professor: 

Prerequisite(s):

6 credit units of 100-level English and permission of the instructor.

Description:

An introductory seminar/workshop in the basic techniques and methods of writing creative nonfiction. By examining the works of established writers, studying craft and history, engaging in workshop discussions, and producing a portfolio, students will be prepared to move forward to the advanced study of creative nonfiction.

Syllabus:

 

ENG 114.3 (96)

Literature and Composition Reading Culture

CRN: 20997

Term: 2 (3 hour lecture)

Time: Mondays, 9:00 am - 11:50 am

Professor: Barbara Langhorst

Description:

An introduction to historical and contemporary cultural forms in English. In addition to learning the tools of critical analysis, students will study and practise composition.

Note:

Only 6 credit units of 100-Level English may be taken for credit.

Syllabus: Click here

 

ENG 220.3 (96)

Studies in the Craft of Writing

CRN: 29215

Term: 2 (3 hour lecture)

Time: Tuesdays, 4pm-6:50pm

Professor:

 

Description:

A study of “reading like a writer,” this course explores two genres—typically, contemporary poetry and fiction—through the critical analysis and subsequent practice of literary technique. In addition to engaging with elements of style through lectures and workshops, students will explore the aesthetic and sociopolitical underpinnings of assigned readings to consider how form and content exist in a mutually enlivening relationship. Visiting authors may be invited into the classroom, and students will be encouraged to attend literary events in the community. By the end of the course, students will have completed at least one research essay and a portfolio of polished writing in two genres.

 

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units 100-level ENG.
Note: Prior completion of ENG 120.3 is strongly recommended.

 

Syllabus:

 

ENG 309.3 (96)

Creative Nonfiction II

CRN: Not offered in 2020/2021

Term: 

Time: Saturday, 10:00 am - 3:50 pm (biweekly)

Professor: TBD

Prerequisite(s):

Successful completion of 6 credit units of 100-level English; a portfolio of 1500-2000 words and permission of the instructor.

Description:

An advanced course for those with prior experience in the craft of writing creative nonfiction. Students will read and practice writing vigorous and compelling work. Mentorship is central; the instructor will aid students in compiling individual reading lists as they write and workshop intensive projects of their own devising.

Syllabus:

 

 

General Engineering

GE 101.1 (97)

Introduction to the Engineering Profession

CRN: 84886

Term: 1 (3 hour lecture)

Time: Mondays, 9:00-11:50 am (biweekly)

Professor: 

Description:

An introduction to the engineering profession: study skills and time management, engineering disciplines, experiential learning through internships, the engineer's role in public health and safety, sustainability, academic and professional ethics, engineering and society, and communication skills.

Syllabus:

 

GE 111.3 (97)

Engineering Problem Solving

CRN: 84885

Lab CRN: 84889

Term: 1 (3 lecture & 3 lab practicum hours)

Time: Tuesdays, 9:00 am - 11:50 am

Lab Time: Tuesdays, 1pm-3:50pm

Professor: 

Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s):

GE 101.

Description:

Review of the application of methods in trigonometry and algebra to problem solving. Graphing techniques. Problem solving strategies. Translation and reduction of "word problems" to algebraic equations. Review of complex numbers and their application in engineering problems. Elements of linear algebra, with MATLAB applications. Coordinate transformation problems. Application of simple numerical methods to engineering problems. Problems involving the solution of nonlinear equations.

Lab (97)

Time:Tuesdays, 1pm-3:50pm

CRN: 84889

 

 

Syllabus: Click here

 

GE 124.3 (97)

Engineering Mechanics I

CRN: 84887

Lab CRN: 84888

Term: 1 (3 lecture & 3 lab practicum hours)

Time: Fridays, 9:00 am - 11:50 am

Lab time: 1pm-3:50pm

Professor: 

Prerequisites or Corequisites:

MATH 123.

Description:

Introduction to statics. This course provides a basic introduction to forces as vectors, force equilibrium of particles, and force and moment equilibrium of rigid bodies. Problems involving friction and the analyses of simple trusses, frames and machines are also introduced. A series of problem laboratories and practical laboratories are designed to help the student apply the principles of statics to practical problems.

Lab (97)

Time: Fridays, 1pm -3:50pm

CRN: 84888

 

Syllabus: Click here

GE 121.3 (96)

Engineering Design

CRN: 25238

Lab CRN: 25909

Term: 2 (3 lecture & 3 lab practicum hours)

Time: Tuesdays, 9am - 11:50 am

Lab Time: Tuesdays, 1pm-3:50pm

Professor: 

Prerequisites:

GE 101 and GE 111 (taken).

Description:

An introduction to design techniques, concepts and processes using examples drawn from a broad range of engineering disciplines. Definition of engineering design. The Design Process. Reporting and communicating. Understanding the problem. Functions and specifications. Finding answers, generating ideas, design alternatives. Managing the process. Sustainability in design. Ethics in design. Concurrent design processes and Design for X.

Lab (98)

Time: Tuesdays, 1pm-3:50pm

 

CRN: 25909

Syllabus: 

 

GE 125.3 (97)

Engineering Mechanics II

        CRN: 25240

Lab CRN: 25910

Term: 2 (3 lecture & 3 lab practicum hours)

             Time: Fridays,   9am - 11:50 am

Lab Time: 1pm-3:50pm

Professor: 

Prerequisite(s) and Corequisite(s):

GE 124 and MATH 123. Registered in MATH 124.

Description:

A continuation of Engineering Mechanics I. The equilibrium of bodies under distributed loads is presented as an introduction to centroids, centers of mass, and area moments of interia. Particle dynamics is the subject of the majority of the course starting with the principles of particle translation under constant and non-constant acceleration. The kinetics of particles during translation, including force-acceleration, work-energy, and impulse-momentum are also applied to practical engineering applications. A series of problem laboratories and practical laboratories provide practical problems to assist in the assimilartion of the principles covered.

Lab (97)

Time: Fridays, 1pm-3:50pm

CRN: 25910

Syllabus

Geology

GEOL 108.3 (96)

The Earth and How It Works

CRN: 25234

Term: 2 (3 hour lecture)

Time: Mondays, 9am - 11:50am

Professor:

Description:

Exploration of the global and local-scale physical processes that have shaped our planet. Strong emphasis is on interrelationships of geological processes and humans. Topics for discussion include volcanoes, earthquakes, pollution, and the origin and exploitation of energy, mineral and water resources. 

Note:

May be used toward the Natural Science requirement for Programs Type A, B, and D (B.A. programs). Students with credit for GEOL 103, 105, 110, or 121 may not take this course for credit. 

Syllabus: 

 

GEOL 121.3 (96)

The Earth and How It Works

CRN: 25235

Lab CRN: 26024

Term: 2 (3 hour lecture & 3 lab practicum hours)

Time: Mondays, 9am - 11:50am

Lab Time: Mondays, 1pm-3:50pm

Professor:

Description:

Exploration of the global and local-scale physical processes that have shaped our planet. Strong emphasis is on interrelationships of geological processes and humans. Topics for discussion include volcanoes, earthquakes, pollution, and the origin and exploitation of energy, mineral and water resources. 

Note:

May be used toward the Natural Science requirement for Programs Type A, B, and D (B.A. programs). Students with credit for GEOL 103, 105, 110, or 121 may not take this course for credit. 

Lab (96B)

Time: Mondays, 1pm - 3:50pm

CRN: 26024

Syllabus: