History

HIST 193.3 (97)

The Conquest of 1759: War, Memory and History

CRN: 86170

Term: 1 (3 lecture)

Time: Thursday, 1:00 pm - 3:50 pm

Professor: Jason Gregory Zorbas 

Description:

On September 13, 1759, two armies assembled on a farmer's field just outside the walls of Quebec City.  The French advanced, the British fired and in 15 minutes the battle that would change Canadian history was over.  Quebec would surrender to the British shortly thereafter and Canada would never be the same.  This course will explore the history of colonization as it led to the crucial battle, discuss how the Battle was fought and then explore the consequences as they ripple into the 21st century.  This course is not just an examination of military history but will include gender, economic, political, ethnic and other historical viewpoints as well as provide an introduction to the discipline of history itself. 

Note:

A maximum of nine credit units of 100-level HIST may be taken for credit. Only six of these credit units may count toward a History major or minor. The remaining three credit units will count as a junior elective in Requirement 7.

Syllabus: Click Here

HIST 194.3 (96)

History Matters Ideas and Culture

CRN: 26689

Term: 1 (3 lecture)

Time: Friday, 1:00 pm - 3:50 pm

Professor: Clay Elliott Burlingham

Description:

The French Revolution, which began in 1789, did not end until 1815.  Its effect was profound, as it not only transformed France, but increasingly came to engulf Europe, with even the ideas it unleashed, reverberating through the subsequent 19th century, as liberty became liberalism, fraternity transformed into nationalism, and equality emerged as socialism.  Further, the French Revolution proved to be the gateway to the modern world, as democracy truly devolved from here, just as did the idea of the rights of the citizen, in place of the duties of the subject. Even the notion of what it meant to be on the political left or right, began with the French Revolution.  At the same time, this revolution that produced freedom of thought, freedom of the press and freedom of assembly, also had a darker side, particularly between 1789 and 1794.

At the beginning of it though, such did not seem possible, for those who began the revolution against the King, certainly did not want to overthrow him, much less execute him, but gradually as trust in the King, gave way to seeing him as resisting the Revolution, a working relationship, finally resulted in no relationship at all.  In fact the King was arrested on August 10, 1792, then put on trial that December, only to be executed on January 21, 1793.  The Queen, Marie Antoinette, did not find a more favorable fate, only a bit longer life, as she was too was tried in October of 1793, and executed on October 16. Those who executed each, were part of a group known as the Jacobins, and they thought such would unify the country behind the Republic that had replaced the Monarchy, but when it did not, they gradually came to seek cohesion, and enforce unity, through a policy of Terror.  This class looks to explore how a country moved from finding unity in a monarchy, to enforcing unity through a guillotine. It will examine the culture of suspicion that produced and was produced by this Terror, as patriotism was exalted over family and friends, while betraying one’s neighbor, if considered an enemy of the nation, was held up as a duty to the country.

Note:

A maximum of nine credit units of 100-level HIST may be taken for credit. Only six of these credit units may count toward a History major or minor. The remaining three credit units will count as a junior elective in Requirement 7.

Syllabus:

Indigenous Studies

INDG 107.3 (97)

Introduction to Canadian Native Studies

     CRN: 85566

Term: 1 (3 lecture)

                  Time: Friday, 1:00 pm - 4:50 pm

Professor: Elaine Hulse

Description:

This course aims to develop the reading, writing, and critical thinking skills of students and provides the background necessary for taking advanced Native Studies courses. It presents an overview of Aboriginal societies in Saskatchewan and Canada through course lectures, seminar discussions and experiential learning activities that link processes of the past with contemporary Aboriginal life and issues. The course material will be delivered in 6 modules. Each module will cover a two-week period and will be taught by a faculty member of the Department of Native Studies. The modules will cover topics such as: Aboriginal Peoples in Saskatchewan, stages of colonization, pre- and post-contact periods, Aboriginal kinship systems, the fur trade, the Treaties, the Indian Act, residential schools, Metis nationhood and land issues, the Federal White Paper Policy (1969), Bill C-31 (1985), Aboriginal rights, Aboriginal land claims, Aboriginal economic development, Aboriginal urbanization and Aboriginal gender issues.

Note:

Students with credit for NS 105, NS 106 (formerly NS 110), or NS 107 may not take this course for credit. This course was labeled NS 107 until 2015. All students in this course will participate in an experiential learning activity, which will require 3-5 hours to complete.

Syllabus: Click Here

Interdiciplinary Studies

Term 1

Kinesiology

KIN 121.3 (96)

Functional Basis of Physical Activity

CRN: 83136

Term: 1 (3 hour lecture)

Time: Thursday, 4:00 pm - 6:50 pm

Professor: Shannon Dawn Forrester

Restriction(s):

Course only open to first and/or second year students.

Description:

Kin 121 is a survey class that gives students a taste of various topics relating to the functional side of Kinesiology. Kin 121 not only provides foundational knowledge in the exercise sciences, but also delivers pertinent and practical information for those interested in maintaining a healthy lifestyle.  As such it is an excellent choice for any student, but especially those interested in the health science (especially nursing, medicine, physical therapy, occupational therapy) or education fields.  

 Not only will students learn about the structural aspects of the human body (skeletal and muscle anatomy) and how the body grows (growth and development), but also how the body moves and responds to various lifestyle behaviours (ex. the biomechanics, exercise physiology, and nutrition of exercise).  Throughout the course students will become familiar with the cardiovascular, respiratory, and digestive systems and be introduced to the training principles needed to acquire the five components of physical fitness: healthy body composition, cardio-respiratory fitness, and musculoskeletal strength, endurance, and flexibility.   Kin 121 also has a lab component, where students will also have the opportunity to directly apply the theoretical concepts of health and physical fitness.  

Syllabus: Click Here

KIN 122.3 (96)

Social Behavioural Foundations of Physical Activity

CRN: 23374

Term: 2 (3 hour lecture)

                             Time: Thursday, 9:00 - 11:50 am

Professor: Shannon Dawn Forrester

Restriction(s):

Course only open to first and/or second year students.

Description:

Kin 121 is a survey class that gives students a taste of various topics relating to the functional side of Kinesiology. Kin 121 not only provides foundational knowledge in the exercise sciences, but also delivers pertinent and practical information for those interested in maintaining a healthy lifestyle.  As such it is an excellent choice for any student, but especially those interested in the health science (especially nursing, medicine, physical therapy, occupational therapy) or education fields.  

 Not only will students learn about the structural aspects of the human body (skeletal and muscle anatomy) and how the body grows (growth and development), but also how the body moves and responds to various lifestyle behaviours (ex. the biomechanics, exercise physiology, and nutrition of exercise).  Throughout the course students will become familiar with the cardiovascular, respiratory, and digestive systems and be introduced to the training principles needed to acquire the five components of physical fitness: healthy body composition, cardio-respiratory fitness, and musculoskeletal strength, endurance, and flexibility.   Kin 121 also has a lab component, where students will also have the opportunity to directly apply the theoretical concepts of health and physical fitness.  

Syllabus: Click Here

 

KIN 150.3 (96)

How Body Moves I                              

CRN: 23036

Term: 2 (3 hour lecture)

Time: Thursday, 12:45 pm - 3:25 pm

Professor: Shannon Dawn Forrester

Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s):

KIN 121 or 111.

Description:

Kin 150: How the Body Moves

 Kin 150 is a truly unique course in which students have the opportunity to take exercise science theory of how the body moves and apply it immediately and directly into a practical setting. Students will become knowledgeable in the principles underpinning human movement (biomechanics and exercise physiology) while at the same time developing their own body-management skills (moving efficiently and safely) and facilitation of the body-management skills of others. Through the medium of gymnastics, students will be introduced to the six mechanically-related movement patterns from which most human movement evolves: The Body in Stillness (Stationary Positions);  Linear Motion  (Explosive = Spring,  Repetitive = Locomotion), Rotational Motion (Rotations, Swing), and Absorbing Movement (Landing). 

 This class is great for any student interested in the health sciences or education or any individual wanting to understand how the body moves whether for personal reasons, coaching, or rehabilitation. Although the class uses fundamental movement patterns found in gymnastics, the theory is applicable to any movement form so absolutely NO gymnastics experience is needed. Who knew a university class that provided both physical and intellectual challenge could be so much fun!

Note:

Students may not receive credit for both KIN 150 and KINA 213.

Syllabus: Click Here

Math

MATH 102.3 (97)

Precalculus Mathematics

CRN: 86171

Term: 1 (3 lecture)

Time: Tuesday, 1:00 pm - 3:50 pm

Professor: Derek Postnikoff

Prerequisites:

Mathematics A30 and B30; or Workplace and Apprenticeship Mathematics 30; or Foundations of Mathematics 30; or Pre-Calculus 30.

Description:

Discusses mathematical ideas essential for the study of calculus. Topics include: the fundamentals of algebra; functions, their properties and graphs; polynomial and rational functions; exponential and logarithmic functions; trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions; trigonometric properties.

Note:

This course may not be taken for credit concurrently with or after any other 100-level MATH course. Students are allowed to have credit for only one of MATH 102 or 104; students who take MATH 102 and then take MATH 104 will lose credit for MATH 102. This course may be used as an alternative prerequisite for MATH 110, 121, 123, or 125 (clears deficiencies in high school 30-level mathematics courses). Students who score below 60% on the Math Placement Test (http://math.usask.ca/placement) are advised to take MATH 102 to review their basis precalculus skills. MATH 102 may not be included in the courses required in C4 or C6 for Applied Mathematics, Mathematical Physics, Mathematics or Statistics. In Arts & Science programs, this course may be used only in the Electives Requirement.

Syllabus: Click Here

MATH 123.3 (97)

Calculus I for Engineers

CRN: 85701
Term: 1 (3 Lecture & 1.5 Practicum)

Time: Wednesday, 1:00 pm - 3:50 pm

Monday, 10:30 am - 11:50 am

Professor: Lawrence Chang
Restrictions: Enrolment in the College of Engineering
Prerequisites: Mathematics A30, B30 and C30; orPre-Calculus 30; or MATH 102 or MATH 104.

Description:

A review of basic algebraic concepts, trigonometry and functions. An introduction to limits and differential and integral calculus, max-min problems, curve sketiching, related rate problems. Specifically for students in the College of Engineering.

Note:

Students are required to take the Math Placement Test prior to enrolling in MATH 123. Students may have credit for only one of MATH 110, 121, 123, or 125.

Syllabus: Click Here

MATH 110.3 (97)

Calculus I 

CRN: 26687

Term: 2 (3 lecture & 1 1/2 practicum hours)

Time: Tuesday, 4:00 pm - 6:50 pm

Thursday, 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Professor: Lawrence Chang

Prerequisites:

Mathematics B30 and C30 and a 60% score in the Math Placement Test; or Pre-Calculus 30 and a 60% score in the Math Placement Test; or MATH 102 or MATH 104.

Description:

Introduction to derivatives, limits, techniques of differentiation, maximum and minimum problems and other applications, implicit differentiation, anti-derivatives.

Note:

MATH 124.3 (96)

Calculus II for Engineers

CRN:26195

Term: 2 (3 Lecture & 1.5 Practicum)

Time: Tuesday, 1:00 pm - 3:50 pm

Thursday, 5:30 pm - 6:50 pm

Professor: Lawrence Chang
Restrictions: Enrolment in the College of Engineering
Prerequisites: MATH123 (taken). Restricted to the College of Engineering.

Description:

Differentiation and integration of inverse trigonometric, exponential, hyperbolic and logarithmic functions with applications. Techniques of integration; applications to work, pressure, moments and centroids. Polar co-ordinates and parametic equations of plane curves; complex numbers.

Note:

Students may have credit for only one of MATH 112, 116, 124, or 128.

Syllabus

Music

Music 111.3 (96)

History of Popular Music

CRN: Not offered in 2016-2017

Term: 2 (3 lecture hours)

Time: 

Professor: Neil Currie

Description:

An introduction to popular music in North America starting chronologically from the Rock 'n' Roll era in the 1950's, and with a particular emphasis on the Canadian scene.  Acquisition of fundamental skills in listening such as the identification of instrumentation, form and texture is a component. No prior musical training is required.

Note:

Open to all students without prerequisite. Students majoring in music may not take this course as an open music elective, but may take this course as an arts elective.

Syllabus:

Nutrition

NUTR 120.3 (96)

Basic Nutrition

CRN: 23793

Term: 2 (3 lecture hours)

Time: Friday, 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm

Professor: Pam J Cherkewich

Description:

An introduction to nutrition and health. The concepts of recommended nutrient intakes and dietary guidelines are introduced. The major nutrients and their functions in the body are outlined. Nutrition issues facing the general public are presented.

Syllabus: Click Here

Philosophy

PHIL 140.3 (96)

Critical Thinking

CRN: 23852

Term: 2 (3 lecture hours)

Time: Wednesday, 7:00 pm - 9:50 pm

Professor: Derek Postnikoff

Description:

Critical thinking is like martial arts for your mind.  By thinking about how we think, we aim to improve both our mental strength and control, thereby helping us better recognize and defend against faulty reasoning, thoughtlessness, and malicious mental manipulation.  Critical thinking is about helping you take active control of your rationality, thereby allowing you to do your part to make the world more reasonable.  The methods of critical thinking are widely applicable throughout both academic and non-academic life: there is no one who would not benefit from taking this course!

Note:

Students with credit for PHIL 240, 241, 243 or CMPT 260 may not take this course for credit. To receive credit for PHIL 140, 240, 241, 243, or CMPT 260, students must take PHIL 140 prior to the above-mentioned courses.

Syllabus: Click Here

Physics

PHYS 115.3 (96)

Physics and the Universe

CRN: 82487

Term: 1 (3 lecture & 2.5 practical hours)

Time: Thursday, 9:00 am - 11:50 pm

Thursday, 1:00 pm - 3:50 pm

Professor: Amir Darmanaki Farahani

Prerequisites:

Physics 30 and (Mathematics B30 and C30; or Foundations of Mathematics 30; or Pre-Calculus 30).

Description:

Provides the first part of an introduction to physics. Emphasis is placed on mechanics, electric and magnetic fields, electric currents and circuits, and the physics of atoms and particles. The course concludes with a discussion of our current understanding of the history of the universe and a discussion of the frontiers of our current understanding of the physical world. Some applications of physics in technology and the health sciences are also discussed.

PHYS 155.3 (97)

Introduction to Electricity and Magnetism

CRN: 25242

Term: 2 (3 lecture & 3 practicum hours)

Time: Thursday, 9:00 am - 11:50 pm

(Every other week) Thursday, 1:00 pm - 3:50 pm

Professor: Amir Darmanaki Farahani

Prerequisites:

GE 124 and MATH 123.

Description:

Begins with an introduction to electricity: elementary electric charge, Coulomb's law, concepts of electric field and electrostatic potential, work, energy and capacitance, and dielectrics. The second part of the class is devoted to circuit analysis: voltage, current, resistance, power, Ohm's law, DC series/parallel circuits, Kirchhoff's laws, circuits with capacitors and R-C transients. The third part of the class focuses on concepts of electromagnetism: magnetic field and magnetic flux, forces acting on a charge and current carrying conductor, and analysis of series magnetic circuits.

Note:

Students can have credit for only one of PHYS 115 or PHYS 155. Students with credit for EP 155 may not take PHYS 155 for credit. EP 155 was last offered in 2004. Required course in the College of Engineering.

Syllabus:

Psychology

PSY 120.3 (97)

Biological and Cognitive Bases of Psychology

CRN: 83898

Term: 1 (3 lecture hours)

Time: Wednesday, 1:00 pm - 3:50 pm

Professor: Br. Kurt Van Kuren

Description:

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the body of knowledge, scientific theory, and research related to the major biological and cognitive areas of psychology. The course focuses on the study of behavior dealing with the essential problems of psychology, the methods of investigation, and the advances that have been made in the fields of neuroscience, sensation and perception, consciousness, memory, learning, language, and motivation and emotion.

Note:

Students with credit for PSY 110 may not take this course for credit.

Syllabus: Click Here

PSY 121.3 (97)

Social Clinical Cultural and Developmental Bases of Psychology

CRN: 24234

Term: 2 (3 lecture hours)

Time: Wednesday, 9:00 am - 11:50 pm

Professor: Br. Kurt Van Kuren

Description:

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the body of knowledge, scientific theory, and research related to the major social, clinical, cultural and developmental areas of psychology. The course focuses on the study of behavior dealing with the essential problems of psychology, the methods of investigation, and the advances that have been made in the fields of intelligence, development, personality, social and cultural psychology, psychological disorders, treatment, and health, stress, and coping.

Note:

Students with credit for PSY 110 may not take this course for credit.

Syllabus:

Religious Studies

RLST 112.3 (97)

Western Religions in Society and Culture

CRN:  85497

Term: 1 (3 lecture)

Time: Monday, 7:00 pm - 9:50 pm

Professor: Lesya Michalina Sabada

Description:

Come and spend a university term at St. Peter’s College, situated in the beautiful fields near Muenster, Saskatchewan. Learn about the sacred rituals and feasts of primal religions scattered around the globe.   Transport yourself to Africa and meet a real Maasai warrior.  Explore how exciting, exotic, mystical and beautiful the world’s religions can be.  Travel back into the milieu of the ancient Middle East which first gave birth to Judaism.  From that sacred religion sprung forth Christianity and Islam, the two greatest missionary religions of the world.  These three monotheistic faiths have more adherents than any other religions, sharing almost half of the world’s population between them. Study witchcraft, meet spiritual healers and shamans, swaying Jews, rebel virgins and desert mothers, and swirling dervishes. See the architectural triumphs of magnificent synagogues, domed churches and arched mosques. Gain a deeper appreciation of the past, present and future reality of many of the people on planet earth. Be inspired!

Note:

Students with credit for RLST 110.6 may not take RLST 112 for credit.

Syllabus:

RLST 210.3 (96)

Religion and Ecology

CRN: 26688

Term: 2 (3 lecture)

Time: Tuesday, 7:00 pm - 9:50 pm

Professor: TBA

Description:

This course explores the interplay between a number of religious traditions and ecology by taking a cross-disciplinary approach to the evaluation of issues of complicity, responsibility, guilt, reconciliation and restoration in human-Earth relations. 

Prerequisite(s): 

3 credit units RLST or 18 credit units at the university level

Syllabus:

Sociology

SOC 111.3 (97)

Foundations in Sociology Society Structure Process

CRN: 82488

Term: 1 (3 hour lecture)

Time: Tuesday, 7:00 pm - 9:50 pm

Professor: Elaine Hulse

Description:

One part of a two-part introduction to the discipline of sociology, the study of society. It examines theories and methods for studying changes to the nature and organization of society from pre-modern, to modern and post-modern. Students will be introduced to core sociological concepts used to understand social inequality, social order, social change, and globalization. 

Note:

Students who have taken SOC 110.6 may not take this course for credit. 

Syllabus:

SOC 112.3 (96)

Foundations in Social Construction of Everyday Life

CRN: 22662

Term: 2 (3 hour lecture)

Time: Wednesday, 1:00 pm - 3:50 pm

Professor: Elaine Hulse

Description:

One part of a two-part introduction to the discipline of sociology, the study of society. It examines how we come to understand and experience ourselves and the world around us and how we create culture. Students will be introduced to the study of culture, socialization, social interaction, identity formation and self-fashioning, the social construction of class, gender and race, age, deviance, and other social phenomena. 

Note:

Students who have taken SOC 110.6 may not take this course credit. 

Syllabus:

SOC 219.3 (96)

Aboriginal Peoples and Justice in Canada

CRN: 26123

Term: 2 (3 hour lecture)

Time: Wednesday, 4:00 pm - 6:50 pm

Professor: Elaine Hulse

Prerequisites: 6 credit units of 100 level SOC.

Description:

Examines the causes and consequences of the over- and under-representation of Aboriginal persons in the Canadian criminal justice system. Topics include prevention, policing, sentencing and courts, incarceration and accommodations. The particular impacts on Aboriginal youth and Aboriginal women are also considered. 

Note: Students with credit for NS 219 may not take this course for credit.

Syllabus:

 

Statistics

STATS 244.3 (97)

Elementary Statistical Concepts

CRN: 86172

Term: 1 (3 lecture 1 practical hours)

Time: Monday, 4:00 pm - 6:50 pm

Wednesday, 4:00 pm – 5:20 pm

Professor: Lawrence Chang

Prerequisites: A course in social science or Mathematics A30 or Foundations of Mathematics 30 or Pre-Calculus 30.

Description:

Statistical concepts and techniques including graphing of distributions, measures of location and variability, measures of association, regression, probability, confidence intervals, hytpthesis testing.

Note:

Students may receive credit for only one of STAT 242, 244, 245, or 246.

Syllabus: Click Here