History

HIST 193.3 (97)

The Conquest of 1759: War, Memory and History

CRN: 86170

Term: 1 (3 lecture)

Time: Thursday, 1:00 pm - 3:50 pm

Professor: Jason Gregory Zorbas 

Description:

On September 13, 1759, two armies assembled on a farmer's field just outside the walls of Quebec City.  The French advanced, the British fired and in 15 minutes the battle that would change Canadian history was over.  Quebec would surrender to the British shortly thereafter and Canada would never be the same.  This course will explore the history of colonization as it led to the crucial battle, discuss how the Battle was fought and then explore the consequences as they ripple into the 21st century.  This course is not just an examination of military history but will include gender, economic, political, ethnic and other historical viewpoints as well as provide an introduction to the discipline of history itself. 

Note:

A maximum of nine credit units of 100-level HIST may be taken for credit. Only six of these credit units may count toward a History major or minor. The remaining three credit units will count as a junior elective in Requirement 7.

Syllabus:

 

HIST 115.3 (96)

History Matters Ideas and Culture

CRN: 26689

Term: 1 (3 lecture)

Time: Friday, 1:00 pm - 3:50 pm

Professor: Clay Elliott Burlingham

Description:

The French Revolution, which began in 1789, did not end until 1815.  Its effect was profound, as it not only transformed France, but increasingly came to engulf Europe, with even the ideas it unleashed, reverberating through the subsequent 19th century, as liberty became liberalism, fraternity transformed into nationalism, and equality emerged as socialism.  Further, the French Revolution proved to be the gateway to the modern world, as democracy truly devolved from here, just as did the idea of the rights of the citizen, in place of the duties of the subject. Even the notion of what it meant to be on the political left or right, began with the French Revolution.  At the same time, this revolution that produced freedom of thought, freedom of the press and freedom of assembly, also had a darker side, particularly between 1789 and 1794.

At the beginning of it though, such did not seem possible, for those who began the revolution against the King, certainly did not want to overthrow him, much less execute him, but gradually as trust in the King, gave way to seeing him as resisting the Revolution, a working relationship, finally resulted in no relationship at all.  In fact the King was arrested on August 10, 1792, then put on trial that December, only to be executed on January 21, 1793.  The Queen, Marie Antoinette, did not find a more favorable fate, only a bit longer life, as she was too was tried in October of 1793, and executed on October 16. Those who executed each, were part of a group known as the Jacobins, and they thought such would unify the country behind the Republic that had replaced the Monarchy, but when it did not, they gradually came to seek cohesion, and enforce unity, through a policy of Terror.  This class looks to explore how a country moved from finding unity in a monarchy, to enforcing unity through a guillotine. It will examine the culture of suspicion that produced and was produced by this Terror, as patriotism was exalted over family and friends, while betraying one’s neighbor, if considered an enemy of the nation, was held up as a duty to the country.

Note:

A maximum of nine credit units of 100-level HIST may be taken for credit. Only six of these credit units may count toward a History major or minor. The remaining three credit units will count as a junior elective in Requirement 7.

Syllabus: